About the Certified Analytics Professional (CAP)

About four months ago I decided to take my passion for decision science to a new level by pursuing the Certified Analytics Professional (CAP) certification.

CAP Logo

Coming from a non-technical background, some people (particularly those with computer science backgrounds) were skeptical of my knowledge and abilities working with large amounts of data and writing predictive models.  (Ironically, one of the same data scientists with a heavy CS background inspired a separate post on the pitfalls of common data cleaning procedures.)  I feel a relevant certification is a great way to give others confidence in my foundation of knowledge in data analytics.

The CAP seems to be the best branded, most well recognized, and best sponsored option for data science related certifications.  In a July 2014 article titled 16 big data certifications that will pay off in CIO magazine, the CAP exam was listed as the first item on the list. Continue reading “About the Certified Analytics Professional (CAP)”

Should You Trust Analytics II: Data Provenance

The process of turning data into information to present it in a simple manner can be incredibly complex.  I believe this irony is primarily because most available data is not formatted for analysis.  Building a large, custom data set with the exact list of features you desire to analyze (Design of Experiments) can be very expensive.  If you have pockets as deep as big Pharma or are ready to dedicate years to a PhD, it’s definitely a great way to go.

Our last blog on trusting data analytics explored how the industry practice of “data cleaning” can spoil the reliability of an entire analysis.  But problems can also occur with perfect, clean, complete, and reliable data.  In this post we will explore the topic of data provenance and how the complexities of data storage can sabotage your data analytics.

Data Provenance 2

The truth is… business data is structured and formatted for business operations and efficient storage.  Observations are usually:

  • Recorded when it is convenient to do so, resulting in time increments that may not represent the events we actually want to measure;
  • Structured efficiently for databases to store and recall, resulting in information on real world events being shattered across multiple tables and systems; and
  • Described according to the IT departments’ naming conventions, resulting in the need to translate each coded observation;

Continue reading “Should You Trust Analytics II: Data Provenance”

Should You Trust Analytics III: Analytics Process

Lack of trust in source data is a common concern with data analytic solutions. A friend of mine is a product manager for a large software company that uses analytics for insights into product sales. He told me the first thing executives and managers do when new analytic products are released in his NYSE-traded, multi-billion dollar  company is…  manually recalculate key metrics.   Why would a busy manager or executive spend valuable time opening up a spreadsheet to recalculate a metric? Because he or she has been burned before by unreliable calculations.

I’ve been exploring the subject of unreliable data since a recent survey  of CEOs revealed that only 1/3 trust their data analytics.   I have also been studying for an exam next week to earn a Certified Analytics Professional designation  to formalize my knowledge on the subject.  While studying each step in the analytics process on INFORMS’ analytic process, the sponsoring organization for the Certified Analytics Professional exam, I’ve considered how things could go wrong and result in an unreliable outcome.  In the flavor of Lean process improvement (an area I specialized earlier in my career), I pulled those potential pitfalls together in a fishbone diagram:

Analytic Errors Fishbone

Continue reading “Should You Trust Analytics III: Analytics Process”

Audit Standards and Data Analytics?

While giving a presentation on Analytics during a recent event, one of the meeting participants asked how the Audit industry felt about data products created using Analytic processes.  On first thought, I consider Analytics to be a form of “analytical procedures”.  This was my response but I had to qualify it by acknowledging that I wasn’t sure how different auditing standards addressed the topic.  Over the last few days I’ve been able to do some research and pull together a quick synopsis of how the most commonly used Audit standards define the work behind Analytics.  In summary my initial impression was pretty close… several of major Audit standards define this type of work and emphasize the reliability of data that underpin Analytic data products.

Analytic Procedurs Graphic Continue reading “Audit Standards and Data Analytics?”

Using Regression to Predict Duplicate Payments

Recently  used logistic regression on supersamples from 400,000,000 paired invoices in a payment system to identify the factors that best predict if an invoice was submitted more than once.  Some less scrupulous business partners do this in hopes of getting paid twice for the same job.  Positive values in the graph increase the probability of an erroneous payment, negative values decrease that probability, and the width of the line surrounding each point provides a 95% confidence interval that is based on the observations.

Duplicate_Pmt_Diagnostics2

I expected the invoice number to be a much larger coefficient but it looks like that number is popular to “fudge” for those that are trying to squeeze an extra payment out of a business partner.  It also looks like questionable invoices are more often submitted at values less than $5K, so businesses aren’t willing to take the same risks on high value invoices.  Is this consistent with what your company has experienced?  Has your company used methods other than logistic regression to get different results?  I’d love to hear about it!